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Classic Comic Cover Corner – Aquaman #1

Posted by on November 10, 2013 – 7:45 am

Every Sunday morning we showcase a classic comic cover, complete with compelling commentary, for your cordial contemplation. It’s the Classic Comic Cover Corner!

Aquaman #1 – February, 1962

Cover Art by Nick Cardy

Aquaman #1 – February, 1962

Aquaman #1 – February, 1962

I came across a very cool online article the other day (see “Modern Renaissance Superhero Designs: Altered Art” by Jessica Patterson on design.org) about classic artwork that has been altered with superhero flair, and some of the results are incredible.

It seems that the creative contest site, Worth1000.com, has hosted several alternative art competitions mixing superheroes and the fine arts, and while perusing the many fascinating pieces in their “Superhero Modern” collection there was one super-redeux in particular that put a big goofy smile on my face.

The Great Wave of Aquaman by Puzopia

The Great Wave of Aquaman
by Puzopia (Worth1000.com)

An artist called “Puzopia” has redone the “The Great Wave” by famous 19th century Japanese artist, Hokusai, as “The Great Wave of Aquaman.” It’s simple, subtle, and for fans of the amazing Atlantean it makes perfect sense to have the “Aquatic Ace” make a cameo in this classic work.

Puzopia’s fine art piece got me to reminiscing about the oft-maligned “King of the Seven Seas” and the many adventures we had together when I was a kid and the proud owner of a Mego Aquaman action figure. (I also had the Mego Spidey and let me tell you there were some epic crossovers played out back in the day.) Therefore, for no other reason, Aquaman #1 from 1962 is this week’s classic comic cover.

Aquaman actually first appeared in 1941 in the pages of More Fun Comics #73, where Dr. Fate was featured on the cover and our fishy hero was just a secondary story by writer Mort Weisinger and artist Paul Norris, called, “Aquaman: The Submarine Strikes.”

The poor “Dweller-in-the-Depths” would not get his own titled book until over twenty-years later, and then he had to share its cover and story, “The Invasion of the Fire-Trolls,” with his sidekick Aqualad and some lame lava-blowing monsters.  But through it all Aquaman kept his sense of humor, even quipping about getting an underwater hot-foot (which I understand is the worst kind.)

UPDATE: It has come to our attention that the legendary Golden & Silver Age comic artist, Nick Cardy, passed away on November 3, 2013. He was 93 years-old and left the world with a fantastic body of work that will entertain comic book fans for generations to come (including two different comics that we’ve featured in CCCC over the past two weeks, unbeknownst of Mr. Cardy’s unfortunate end.) RIP Mr. Cardy and thank you for your awesome contributions to pop culture.

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